Medical Writings5 June 2001
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    The following article initiates a series on “Words That Make a Difference.” Developed under the sponsorship of the American Academy on Physician and Patient, the series will focus on the language physicians use when they talk with patients. Although clinicians understand how important it is to communicate effectively with patients, they often have difficulty knowing exactly what the “best words” are for making the most of each patient interaction. Drawing on careful observation and research results, the authors of this series of articles have identified words and expressions that have proven particularly powerful as tools for understanding patients and helping ...

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