Ideas and Opinions18 August 2015
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    Thyroid dysfunction is common, is readily diagnosed, and is treated in a cost-effective manner. Recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force did not recommend screening for thyroid dysfunction in nonpregnant adults because of a lack of evidence that screening of asymptomatic patients affects clinical outcomes (1, 2). In contrast, over the last decade, 7 professional organizations, including the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Thyroid Association, and Latin American Thyroid Society, have given guidance on how and when to use thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) testing for the millions of Americans with undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction (Table) (3, 4).

    Table 1.Recommendations of 8 ...

    References

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