It is no exaggeration to declare that the greatest blot on the record of medicine in the 20th century is the role played by German physicians in the Nazi era. At the postwar trial at Nuremberg, the court found 15 German physicians guilty of war crimes and sentenced 7 of them to death [1]. After the trial, the German medical establishment carefully cultivated the theory that the violations that had occurred were the acts of this handful of physicians working in a few notorious concentration camps [2]. Until the mid-1960s, most commentators accepted this version of the events. Not the ...

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